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There is currently a trial underway that is drawing a substantial amount of publicity and not just because it relates to a wealthy individual running afoul of the complex US Tax code. 


While Mr. Manafort is garnering a lot of publicity because of who his past associations have been and where they are from, his trial is focusing on some rather mundane financial issues/crimes.

One of the key elements of the case against Mr. Manafort is the lack of proper reporting of foreign income or control over foreign bank accounts. The failure to follow the rules on these two issues can be very costly and in 2018 is something the US government can and will pursue.

Consider that the penalties reach around $10,000 and climb from there and there is an incredible paper trail that can be easily followed in most cases and it is no wonder that the US government pursues these cases with vigor.

Now that Mr. Manafort’s accountant and tax advisor has testified about how he answered the questions related to foreign accounts for US tax purposes, it will be interesting to see how his defense team responds. Ignorance of the law has typically not worked well as a defense in these cases, especially when the prosecution has provided evidence of extensive use of foreign accounts by the defendant for regular and exotic purchases.

For anyone getting nervous about their foreign holdings or wishing to avoid a Manafort spectacle trial experience, GP CPA is only an email or call away.

 

The Employee Retention Credit (ERC)

The Employee Retention Credit (ERC)

The Employee Retention Credit (“ERC”) has had some upgrades and retrofits to some of the basic calculations with the most recent (12.27.20) CARES Act changes.

Good Riddance, 2020

Good Riddance, 2020

What is new in 2021? Meals in 2021 are once again 100% deductible, the next round of PPP funding is coming and the Employee Retention Credit (ERC) has been changed.

What Tax Breaks Changed From 2018?

What Tax Breaks Changed From 2018?

Congress extended some of the tax breaks retroactively to January 1, 2018. They now expire on December 31, 2020. Learn more about tax breaks that have been extended.

Dear Client, I have good news!

Dear Client, I have good news!

Since we now have less than 90 days left in the year, kindly keep me apprised of when you expect the major revenue collections to be during the next few weeks and we can adjust accordingly.

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